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Tiago Splitter splitting his time between coaching and scouting

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2014 NBA Finals - Practice Day And Media Availability

In an interview with Brazil’s Globo TV, Tiago Splitter talks about his dual role with the Nets ... and about what to expect from Brooklyn’s team.

The role, according to the Nets press release last April, is supposed to be more of a “hybrid,” as he calls it, with him serving as a scout with “added duties related to player on-court development,” aka a big man coach But from reading the interview and a few sightings of the former Spur around the Nets practice facility, it looks like he’s doing more coaching than scouting ,

The seven-footer who played in both Europe and the NBA participates “training” in the morning, he says, watching closely the “technical development ,” particularly the “young centers,” which has to mean Jarrett Allen as well as Brooklyn’s other 20-something bigs. In the afternoon, Splitter says he is in the Nets’ front office, “working on player assessment and team planning.”

Splitter who won an NBA ring in San Antonio in 2014, with Marks as a Spurs assistant, told Globo TV the team goals are improvement but also development,

“Our goal this year is to improve last year’s result when we had 28 wins. We want to do more than that, but we also think about the long run,” Splitter said, according to a Google translation.

“Nothing is for now. We are in a process. And I think most of the Eastern teams are in a rebuilding process. If you look at the teams from the West, there is more money invested [in winning now], the cases of Houston, Golden State, Minnesota, Denver, San Antonio ... These are teams that invest in the objective of winning now, and in our case, it’s a bit different, with young athletes, trying to develop them.”

Splitter, 33, officially retired last February and joined the Nets, along with Pablo Prigioni, his former Spanish league teammate, two months later. A recurring hip injury had limited him the past several years.

He was interviewed Monday night when the Nets faced the Knicks. He noted comparisons between the two clubs.

“Both teams have similar goals,” he said. “Develop the promising players of the teams, that they gain more court time, experience, then in the future acquire players of more stature, and with these young people, have the chance to challenge for a conference title, for example.”

Like his fellow members of the Nets front office, he provided no timetable.