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Jarrett Jack - a matter of respect ... and numbers

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Evan Habeeb-USA TODAY Sports

There's been endless discussions of Jarrett Jack's numbers, particularly his +/- last season.  Even he admits they're a problem, but not so much about the respect he commands around the league. In last year's GM survey, he was on a short list of NBA players who general managers thought would take the coaching reins some day.

Rod Boone talked to Jack --and others-- for a story Sunday on Boone's circle of friends around the league, a circle enlarged by the number of teams he's played for -- seven in 10 years -- but mainly because of that personality.  He concludes...

Jack is like a mayor around the league, seemingly always bumping into opposing players with whom he has a good relationship. He's left indelible marks everywhere he has been, using that infectious personality of his to make lifelong friends.

Thaddeus Young agrees with that asessment....

"Jarrett has definitely been a journeyman. But he's done well and played great on all the teams that he's played for and they have all valued him as a good player. We continue to value him as a good player for our team and I think that's definitely seen and known around the league."

Jack understands the other side of the equation, that is, the literal equation. The opposition outscored the Nets by 315 points when he was on the floor. That was, by far, the worst number in the NBA. Second was Brandon Bass, at 180.  Jack says he didn't know it was that bad.

"I didn't know it was where it was last year and I take it on the chin, man. I'm not the one to just look at it and just shrug it off. Anything that I feel is an area that I can improve on, I want to improve on. Plus-minus, three-point percentage, a few things."

Nets ownership, management and coaching staff all profess faith in Jack's ability to lead the team to the playoffs. We are about to find out if leadership can trump numbers ... or whether Jack can improve on the latter while maintaining the former.