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Brook Lopez talks hoops, heroes, family and his "idiot" brother

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Anthony Gruppuso-USA TODAY Sports

Steve Serby last spoke with Lionel Hollins and it was quite revealing as the Nets coach broke down each of his key players' skillset and psyche.  Sunday, it's Brook Lopez's turn talking the Post's interviewer.  Lopez says his goal is to be the best team in the league, not just New York; talks about his hobbies, his upbringing and what basketball means to him.

Here's a sample...

On being Brooklyn's team and what it requires...

"When you think back to Brooklyn and Dem Bums, the Brooklyn Dodgers — the grit, the toughness, the fortitude — and I think we like [to display] those traits on the floor when we play. We’re in it together."

On the frustration of missing last season and how it made him think about his connection to the game...

"I didn’t like missing last season. It frustrated me. I love playing, I love basketball, and so I’m happy to be back out on the floor. I’m blessed to be able to be out there. … [It] made me realize how much I love the game. I want to get back to the way I was."

What bothers him in terms of criticism...

"I’d say if there was anything, it would be more that I pay more attention or care more about off-court stuff, my other interests that somehow are taken in a negative way, and that I don’t care about the game as much as I should, ’cause I love the game, I’ve played it my entire life. It’s what I do, it’s my job, it’s what I live for, and I love being out on the floor."

On being the best team in New York...

"Like I said, if we’re the best team in the league, that’s much better than just out of New York."

On what was the best thing about his trips to Africa...

"I think it was Tanzania, we were with the Starkey Foundation, and we were fitting some of the locals with hearing aids. Some of ’em are kids from like 4 years old to adult tribe members, they were like 80-something years old, who have hearing problems. And just going through the process, fitting ’em with the hearing aid and then giving them a plastic tubing around their ear to hold it in place. When we’d start changing the levels, we’d make this noise … in their ear to see if they’d hear. And if they didn’t, you could turn it up a little more, and then continue the test. And when you finally, saw their like eyes go big, and they realize they’re finally hearing something for the first time. It was an amazing moment, it’s really an indescribable moment. Just seeing ’em hear for the first time, react to that, and then 15 minutes later when they’re done that, the kids especially, running around just shouting nonsense to hear themselves speak. … It was amazing. And then you have a mom who turns around and thanks you ’cause she can finally hear her child say, 'I love you.'"

On his own mother...

"It’s really hard to put into words. She’s just done so much for us over the years, how much she’s sacrificed. … She raised four big boys on a single mom’s public school teaching salary. She’d drive us all around L.A. and then Fresno getting us to practices, dropping [twin brother] Robin and I off to practice, going to pick [brother] Chris up from somewhere else, setting [brother] Alex up. Whatever we wanted or needed from her, she’d go out of her way to get. She let us try everything out, we weren’t strictly basketball players. He got us interested in art, she took us to the Getty Museum out in L.A. She read to us all the time, got us interested in other stuff that is a little more outside the box."

Finally, on what separates him from his brother, who he plays next week in Portland...

"Robin’s an idiot."

Q: You obviously want him to read this.

"Yeah, yeah. … Robin’s a complete moron."

There's a LOT more in the interview.