FanPost

The Free Agent Files: Antawn Jamison

As this offseason rolls on, we'll take a look at another player who could be on the Nets radar. Who is it today?

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Photo from SB Nation Cleveland

Take the jump and we'll delve into Antawn Jamison (and try not to think too much about Tyler Hansbrough flopping) .

Once upon a time, Jamison was one of the better power forwards in the league. He could put it on the floor and attack the basket, handle himself in the post, could hit a good amount of threes and was someone you would run your offense through. These days, Jamison is best suited as a fourth option on offense that'll grab a few rebounds here and there.

How'd Jamison do last year? Let's go to the numbers:

Metric

Antwan Jamison 2011-2012

Power Forwards in 2011-2012

Jamison's career

Minutes per game

33.1 21 36.3

True Shooting %

48.1 53 52.2

Rebound rate

10.8 13.6 12.1

Assist rate

11.9 12.85 8.7

Turnover rate

7.2 13.43 8.2

Usage rate

26.2 18.61 24.7

Player Efficiency Rating

16.1 15 18.3

Win Shares per 48

.070 .100 .112

Wins Produced per 48

-.037 .099 .065

On the surface it doesn't look pretty. His shooting was way down, but there might be a reason for that. Last season, he suffered a pinky injury on his left hand that ended his season prematurely. He also suffered a left leg injury this season that might've further hindered his shooting touch. Regardless of whether injuries negatively affected his shot, it was still ugly. For those unaware, True Shooting % incorporates free throw shooting, two point shooting and three point shooting into one measure that gauges how a player is shooting (here's a dandy how-to featuring our pal Dwight Howard). In general, like regular field goal %, 50% is around where you wanna be, and anything lower that is not good for business. Couple that with 26% of the team's possessions running through him and the picture gets even uglier. One good thing to note with relation to his shooting was his work from downtown. 34% is around league average, and Jamison shot 34% from three so it wasn't all bad. Another plus, and one that should help the new Nets roster is his percentages from the corner. Jamison shot 38% shooting the corner three, and with slashers like Deron Williams, Joe Johnson and Gerald Wallace who are also good passers, there should be some good, open looks for Jamison.

Rebounding matters. And when you're a frontcourt player, rebounding takes on even more importance. And Jamison was terrible at rebounding. The average 4 grabbed close to 14% of the available rebounds on the court, while Jamison was only able to collect 10% of the available rebounds. And for a team that was missing Anderson Varejao for the majority of the year, his inability to control the glass hindered their slim playoff chances.

Jamison is 35 so one would expect his defense to be somewhat diminished at this stage in his career. And that played itself on an individual level. Opposing power forwards had a PER of 18 against him, which isn't great but pretty respectable for a 35 year old never known for great defensive play. When we look at Jamison's defense on a team level, things fall apart. The Cavaliers allowed an astonishing 113 points per 100 possessions with him on the court vs. a more respectable 103 per 100 with him out of the game. And on a team that, at the moment, is lacking in frontcourt depth, the Nets would need Jamison to buck his downward defensive trend if he were to join their organization.

How did he compare to last season's starter, Kris Humphries?

Metric

Antwan Jamison 2011-2012

Kris Humphries 2011-2012

Minutes per game

33.1 34.8

True Shooting %

48.1 53.9

Rebound rate

10.8 18.3

Assist rate

11.9 13.14

Turnover rate

7.2 13

Usage rate

26.2 19.3

Player Efficiency Rating

16.1 17.9

Win Shares per 48

.070 .118

Wins Produced per 48

-.037 .180

Not all that well. The only edge Jamison had over Humphries was ball control, as he committed fewer turnovers than Humphries. Other than that, it's a rout in Humphries favor. He converted on more of his shots, was able to spread the ball around more, and has been one of the elite rebounders in the league since he joined the Nets organization. Sure he operates best inside of 10 feet, but who can complain when you convert the majority of your shots. And Humphries has the edge on defense, although calling it an "edge" is a bit of a stretch. Opposing 4s had a PER of 17.3 against Humphries and the Nets allowed 110 points per 100 with him on the court vs. 111 with him on the bench. Hooray for low standards!

Despite the gloomy outlook of this post, I think Jamison could provide some value to the Nets. Floor spacing and the perceived threat of a three point sniper would fit well here, as the Nets attempted the third most three pointers per game in the NBA last season. However, the overall inefficiency with his offense, bad rebounding and bad defense make this a poor move for the Nets. Might as well resign Humphries and call it a day.

For more reading on Jamison, head up to Fear The Sword.

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